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to contrast that with a well known famous saying among lawyers that hard cases make bad law. in a case like this, with such extraordinary circumstances, around such an aberrant event, the best opportunities to pass meaningful legislation are not in the wake of these sort of crazy one off extraordinary events. what do you make of that? >> well, it is a real conundrum. on the one hand, holmes was right. you don't want extraordinary circumstances to create general law for average circumstances. but in another sense, this was not extraordinary. in fact, we've been living in something of a bubble. the fbi has done actually a fairly amazing job over the last decade of stopping many terrorist acts like when they occurred in other countries and europe and the middle east. and this was one that got through. but there are ways in which you could actually change laws to further enable the fbi. going back to michael isikoff's report. what if members of this mosque in boston had contacted law enforcement authorities under a new program and warned them that this fellow tsarnaev was looking a little errat
. that got law enforcement zeroing on the two brothers. bill: mike, we're trying to piece this together as best we can but what can you tell us about the reports that the fbi is questioning him today from his hospital bed? >> reporter: all of that goes back to a "usa today" report citing anonymous sources. the sourcing is not as tight as i would like but certainly a significant development. we know he has been sedated. he has a injury to his neck or jaw, a bullet wound to his neck or jaw that prevented him from communicating. 9 report says he was roused back to consciousness and providing things in writing and providing substantive answers to questions. we know from the information he is providing that indicates there is not a larger network and not a second wave of bombings to be feared, bill. bill: mike, thank you. we'll be back with you when there are more headlines from boston. mike leading our coverage there martha. martha: we are hearing the police chatter when police first spotted dzhokhar tsarnaev hiding in that covered boat. massachusetts state police released the stunning infr
. let me assure you the subcommittee is ready to help in any way we can to help law enforcement against perpetrators and planners of this act of terror and insure ensure the full force of justice is -- to think something like that taking place anything this committee do we stand ready. i want to express disappointment with regard to you and me in the subcommittee. in somecas has not takimportantm disappointed that the depant bee authities the committee to expand federal prison -- it has fallen from 23,000 in 2006 to 12,800 in fy14. this is an area where leadership is necessary and we have made it very clear that i want to support you in this effort that we need to see to take it seriously in an energetic way and we have not seen it. why can't that picture with the entire federal government and why can't the ncaa -- from prisons. you can put a man or woman in prison for 50 years and give them no work and no dignity. this will not displace american jobs but a proven way to end recidivism to make progress. i am also dissatisfied and disappointed with a noncommittal response to my suggestio
of the sequester and it's important to emphasize it is not a one-year proposition is writt into law to continue. given a list of fat and the woulit be fair to say then, riouses security risk basedt right now? >> it certainly is consuming a company intelligence community leadership for what we see happening to the capability and importantly the expectations people seem to have for our having this global insight and that is going to be very hard. if we sustain sequestration through 2021, what the law calls for, as i said in my testimony to the senate in telogen's community and a day before, we collectively have to rethink what people expect from the intelligence community because it isn't going to be the same. >> general flynn. >> i just want to emphasize is a senior leader, just to reemphasize the general clapper talked about, we are about people and we do not want to damage that vital component of our capability. the sequestration provides is no flexibility. not just this year, but over the long haul. our adversaries won't take a strategic pause and the real cost director clapper highlightedvwe
it into law. that undertaking and many others, john berry made a real difference of the more than 62,000 federal workers and everyone else who called my district home. just as we look to our federal workers to watch out for us, our federal workers look to john to watch out for them, to make sure they have a safe work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national z
happened including american support for -- as a law enforcement and intelligence practitioner is inclusiveness in america. as a law enforcement tool, i worried all along when i was in the business that americans would start to say as a result of events like this that there are real americans and other americans. that kind of mentality if we ever get it will accelerate i think these cases of radicalization. kids like this when they take the oath will say i took the oath but i'm still not accepted. >> to what exstent one of the dangers here? one can overread too much. these may be two cases of a bad situation. to what extent might be assimilation machine in the u.s. be broken down or not functioning as well as it used to. in europe, minority communities were excluded marginalized but not in the united states. the polling data suggests that. but does this tell us maybe we should pay attention to that? >> compared to what? the assimilation mod until the united states works marvelously compared to france or germany or great britain. if you look back in history, the irish, the jews,
by will you -- must include the contributions of the transgendered? by law. you will have to have pages on transgendered contributions. people who were crossed over sex, or dressed in the other sex. clothing. isn't that absurd? isn't that totalitarian? i thought the purpose of the textbook was to tell the truth, not make groups feel good. but as i point out in the book, leftism is overwhelmingly rooted in feelings. >> host: dennis prager is the author. "still the best hope" is the name of his recent best seller. louis from florida, you're on the air. you're talking with dennis prager. >> caller: i'd like to ask mr. prayinger and his ilk what he just said about truth, why should people believe the bible when that's the biggest novel ever written? who believes the earth is 5,000 years old? how can you follow a book that tells you the world is 5,000 years old and hisclass commentary about the christian schools and the seminary, how does he say something like that and he wants to be honest? i know this man is a right winger, and he wouldn't fifth credit to anybody, but my main question is,
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

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